Friday, 26 July 2013

IEEE 2013: CLOUD COMPUTING FOR MOBILE USERS: CAN OFFLOADING COMPUTATION SAVE ENERGY?

IEEE 2013 TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING 

 Technology - Available in Android

Cloud computing1 is a new paradigm in which computing resources such as processing, memory, and storage are not physically pres-ent at the user’s location. Instead, a service provider owns and manages these resources, and users access them via the Internet. For example, Amazon Web Services lets users store personal data via its Simple Storage Service (S3) and perform computations on stored data using the Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). This type of computing provides many advantages for businesses—including low initial capital investment, shorter start-up time for new services, lower maintenance and operation costs, higher utilization through virtual-ization, and easier disaster recovery—that make cloud computing an attractive option. Reports suggest that there are several benefits in shifting computing from the desktop to the cloud.1,2 What about cloud computing for mobile users? The primary constraints for mobile computing are limited energy and wireless bandwidth. Cloud computing can provide energy savings as a service to mobile users, though it also poses some unique challenges.

IEEE 2013:CloudMoV: Cloud-based Mobile Social TV


IEEE 2013 TRANSACTIONS ON MULTIMEDIA 

Technology - Available in Android
Abstract—The rapidly increasing power of personal mobile devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) is providing much richer contents and social interactions to users on the move. This trend however is throttled by the limited battery lifetime of mobile devices and unstable wireless connectivity, making the highest possible quality of service experienced by mobile users not feasible. The recent cloud computing technology, with its rich resources to compensate for the limitations of mobile devices and connections, can potentially provide an ideal platform to support the desired mobile services. Tough challenges arise on how to effectively exploit cloud resources to facilitate mobile services, especially those with stringent interaction delay requirements. In this paper, we propose the design of a Cloud-based, novel Mobile social tV system (CloudMoV). The system effectively utilizes both PaaS (Platform-as-a-Service) and IaaS (Infrastructure-asa- Service) cloud services to offer the living-room experience of video watching to a group of disparate mobile users who can interact socially while sharing the video. To guarantee good streaming quality as experienced by the mobile users with time varying wireless connectivity, we employ a surrogate for each user in the IaaS cloud for video downloading and social exchanges on behalf of the user. The surrogate performs efficient stream transcoding that matches the current connectivity quality of the mobile user. Given the battery life as a key performance bottleneck, we advocate the use of burst transmission from the surrogates to the mobile users, and carefully decide the burst size which can lead to high energy efficiency and streaming quality. Social interactions among the users, in terms of spontaneous textual exchanges, are effectively achieved by efficient designs of data storage with BigTable and dynamic handling of large volumes of concurrent messages in a typical PaaS cloud. These various designs for flexible transcoding capabilities, battery efficiency of mobile devices and spontaneous social interactivity together provide an ideal platform for mobile social TV services. We have implemented CloudMoV on Amazon EC2 and Google App Engine and verified its superior performance based on real world experiments.




Wednesday, 24 July 2013

IEEE 2013: On Quality of Monitoring for Multi-channel Wireless Infrastructure Networks


IEEE 2013 TRANSACTION ON MOBILE COMPUTING

 
Technology- Available in Java and Dot Net

Abstract—Passive monitoring utilizing distributed wireless sniffers is an effective technique to monitor activities in wireless infrastructure networks for fault diagnosis, resource management and critical path analysis. In this paper, we introduce a quality of monitoring (QoM) metric defined by the expected number of active users monitored, and investigate the problem of maximizing QoM by judiciously assigning sniffers to channels based on the knowledge of user activities in a multi-channel wireless network. Two types of capture models are considered. The user-centric model assumes frame-level capturing capability of sniffers such that the activities of different users can be distinguished while the sniffer-centric model only utilizes the binary channel information (active or not) at a sniffer. For the user-centric model, we show that the implied optimization problem is NP-hard, but a constant approximation ratio can be attained via polynomial complexity algorithms. For the sniffer-centric model, we devise stochastic inference schemes to transform the problem into the user-centric domain, where we are able to apply our polynomial approximation algorithms. The effectiveness of our proposed schemes and algorithms is further evaluated using both synthetic data as well as real-world traces from an operational WLAN.

IEEE 2013: Optimal Multicast Capacity and Delay Tradeoffs in MANETs

IEEE 2013 TRANSACTIONS ON MOBILE COMPUTING

Technology- Available in Java and Dot Net

Abstract—In this paper, we give a global perspective of multicast capacity and delay analysis in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs). Specifically, we consider four node mobility models: (1) two-dimensional i.i.d. mobility, (2) two-dimensional hybrid random walk, (3) one-dimensional i.i.d. mobility, and (4) one-dimensional hybrid random walk. Two mobility time-scales are investigated in this paper: (i)  Fast mobility where node mobility is at the same time-scale as data transmissions; (ii) Slow mobility where node mobility is assumed  to occur at a much slower time-scale than data transmissions. Given a delay constraint D, we first characterize the optimal multicast capacity for each of the eight types of mobility models, and then we develop a scheme that can achieve a capacity-delay tradeoff close to the upper bound up to a logarithmic factor. In addition, we also study heterogeneous networks with infrastructure support.

Wednesday, 17 July 2013

IEEE 2013 :DCIM: Distributed Cache Invalidation Method for Maintaining Cache Consistency in Wireless Mobile Networks


IEEE 2013 Transactions on Mobile Computing

Technology - Available in Java and Dot Net

Abstract—This paper proposes distributed cache invalidation mechanism (DCIM), a client-based cache consistency scheme that is implemented on top of a previously proposed architecture for caching data items in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs), namely COACS, where special nodes cache the queries and the addresses of the nodes that store the responses to these queries. We have also previously proposed a server-based consistency scheme, named SSUM, whereas in this paper, we introduce DCIM that is totally client-based. DCIM is a pull-based algorithm that implements adaptive time to live (TTL), piggybacking, and perfecting, and provides near strong consistency capabilities. Cached data items are assigned adaptive TTL values that correspond to their update rates at the data source, where items with expired TTL values are grouped in validation requests to the data source to refresh them, whereas unexpired ones but with high request rates are prefetched from the server. In this paper, DCIM is analyzed to assess the delay and bandwidth gains (or costs) when compared to polling every time and push-based schemes. DCIM was also implemented using ns2, and compared against client-based and server-based schemes to assess its performance experimentally. The consistency ratio, delay, and overhead traffic are reported versus several variables, where DCIM showed to be superior when compared to the other systems.


Index Terms—Cache consistency, data caching, client-based, invalidation, MANET, TTL

IEEE 2013: Generation of Personalized Ontology Based on Consumer Emotion and Behavior Analysis


IEEE 2013 Transaction on Affective Computing

Technology - Available in  Java and Dot Net

Abstract—The relationships between consumer emotions and their buying behaviors have been well documented. Technology-savvy consumers often use the web to find information on products and services before they commit to buying. We propose a semantic web usage mining approach for discovering periodic web access patterns from annotated web usage logs which incorporates information on consumer emotions and behaviors through self-reporting and behavioral tracking. We use fuzzy logic to represent real-life temporal concepts (e.g., morning) and requested resource attributes (ontological domain concepts for the requested URLs) of periodic pattern based web access activities. These fuzzy temporal and resource representations, which contain both behavioral and emotional cues, are incorporated into a Personal Web Usage Lattice that models the user’s web access activities. From this, we generate a Personal Web Usage Ontology written in OWL, which enables semantic web applications such as personalized web resources recommendation. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by presenting experimental results in the context of personalized web resources recommendation with varying degrees of emotional influence. Emotional influence has been found to contribute positively to adaptation in personalized recommendation

IEEE 2013 :Winds of Change From Vendor Lock-In to the Meta Cloud


IEEE 2013 Internet Computing

Technology - Available in Java and Dot Net

The cloud computing paradigm has achieved widespread adoption in recent years. Its success is due largely to customers’ ability to use services on demand with a pay-as-you go pricing model, which has proved convenient in many respects. Low costs and high flexibility make migrating to the cloud compelling. Despite its obvious advantages, however, many companies hesitate to “move to the cloud,” mainly because of concerns related to service availability, data lock-in, and legal uncertainties.1 Lock in is particularly problematic. For one thing, even though public cloud availability is generally high, outages still occur.2 Businesses locked into such a cloud are essentially at a standstill until the cloud is back online. Moreover, public cloud providers generally don’t guarantee particular service level agreements (SLAs)3 — that is, businesses locked into a cloud have no guarantees that it will continue to provide the required quality of service (QoS). Finally, most public cloud providers’ terms of service let that provider unilaterally change pricing at any time. Hence, a business locked into a cloud has no mid- or long term control over its own IT costs.